Human Exosome From Stem Cell

Human Exosome From Stem Cell

Human Exosome From Stem Cell Product: Human Mesenchymal stem cell from Cord Blood   Regenerative medicine therapy based on cell-based therapy is innovatively contributing to the rehabilitation and treatment. The mechanisms of activities of SCs can be explained by exosomes, the content available in body fluids such as blood, serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Exosomes are 30 to 100 nm are membrane-bound extracellular vehicles (EVs). They contain lipids and genetic materials and take part in intercellular communications, via relocating and transferring their contents, from their cells of origin to their target cells. At this time, exosomes have been confirmed to be secreted from various cells including B cells, T cells, dendritic cells, platelets, the Schwann cells, tumor cells, cardio-myocytes, endothelial cells, and stem cells among others. Additionally, exosomes are found in physiological fluids such as urine, plasma, and cerebral fluid and even in organs such as thymus. Secretion of exosome (Exo), trophic factors, and other substances capable of inducing neurogenesis, angiogenesis, contribute to the reduction of inflammation and synaptogenesis, upon administration into the injured or damaged tissue, are significant properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). On the basis of the ability of micro vesicles (MVs) to mimic stem cell properties, it is speculated that stem cell-derived MVs especially exosomes represent a relevant therapeutic option in regenerative medicine.
Exo-Product Description U/M Separation Method
Med-CBExo Human Umbilical Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stem Cell Exosomes Frozen/Vial Ultracentrifuge
Med-BMExo Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Exosomes Frozen/Vial Ultracentrifuge
Med-SeExo Human Cord Blood Serum Exosomes Frozen/Vial Ultracentrifuge
  • ALL cultured cells have been screened negative for Hep-B, Hep-C, HIV-1, HIV-2, SARS COVID19 and Syphilis. All separated exosomes experience includes DLS, SEM, total protein concentration, RNA concentration.
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